A new study has revealed the percentage of female managers in 41 OECD and EU countries

Never before has the topic of gender parity been at the forefront of international public debate. The recent publication of gender pay gap figures revealed 78% of larger companies pay men more than women in the UK.

Technology career platform Honeypot has released a study that reveals the gender gap in managerial roles in 41 Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and EU countries. The study chose to focus on the gender disparity in senior positions as it pinpoints one of the issues contributing to pay gaps.

“Gender parity in the workplace is not just an ethical or moral issue, but also an economic one: McKinsey found that $12 trillion could be added to global GDP by 2025 by advancing women’s equality. As tech recruitment specialists, we are often confronted with the gender imbalances of the industry, which are fully exposed in this study,” says Emma Tracey, Co-Founder at Honeypot. “The results reveal the countries which have the most to offer women looking to progress in the tech industry, with Portugal, The United States, and Latvia highlighted as the top three nations that have taken positive steps towards gender parity in the technology field in terms of fairer wages. However, with the proportion of female tech workers remaining under 30% across the board, we hope that this study will enrich the conversation concerning equality in this industry and inspire more women to seek out opportunities in tech.”

The study used figures from the World Economic Forum to find the percentage of women in senior or managerial positions as well as the percentage of women in parliament and ministerial positions. The tables below reveal the top and bottom 10 companies from the findings:

Top 10 Countries for % of Female Managers   Bottom 10 Countries for % Female Managers

#

Country

% Women in Senior or Managerial Roles

#

Country

% Women in Senior or Managerial Roles

1

Latvia

44.4%

41

South Korea

10.7%

2

United States

43.5%

40

Japan

11.5%

3

Hungary

40.5%

39

Turkey

13.0%

4

New Zealand

40.1%

38

Luxembourg

17.4%

5

Poland

40.1%

37

Cyprus

22.5%

6

Lithuania

39.8%

36

Croatia

23.1%

7

Sweden

39.4%

35

Chile

25.4%

8

Iceland

38.3%

34

Netherlands

25.9%

9

Slovenia

37.5%

33

Greece

25.9%

10

Bulgaria

36.7%

32

Italy

26.5%

 

Top 10 Countries for % Women in Parliament   Bottom 10 Countries for % Women in Parliament

#

Country

% Women in Parliament

#

Country

% Women in Parliament

1

Sweden

43.5%

41

Japan

9.9%

2

Mexico

42.5%

40

Hungary

9.9%

3

Finland

41.5%

39

Malta

13.0%

4

Iceland

41.2%

38

Romania

13.8%

5

Spain

40.1%

37

Turkey

15.3%

6

Norway

39.8%

36

Croatia

15.3%

7

Belgium

39.4%

35

Chile

16.0%

8

Netherlands

37.5%

34

South Korea

17.4%

9

Denmark

37.5%

33

Latvia

18.0%

10

Slovenia

36.7%

32

United States

19.4%

 

Top 10 Countries for % Women in Ministerial Positions   Bottom 10 Countries for % Women in Ministerial Positions

#

Country

% Women in Ministerial Positions

#

Country

% Women in Ministerial Positions

1

Finland

62.5%

41

Hungary

0.0%

2

Sweden

52.2%

40

Slovak Republic

0.0%

3

France

50.0%

39

Turkey

3.8%

4

Norway

47.1%

38

South Korea

5.7%

5

Netherlands

46.8%

37

Malta

7.4%

6

Estonia

46.2%

36

Cyprus

9.1%

7

Iceland

44.4%

35

Greece

9.9%

8

Italy

43.8%

34

Romania

14.5%

9

Slovenia

43.8%

33

Australia

17.4%

10

Switzerland

42.9%

32

Mexico

18.0%

 

The UK is lagging behind when it comes to women rising to the upper rungs of the corporate ladder. When it comes to the percentage of women who are senior officials and managers, the UK was ranked 14th with 33.23% in those positions. For the percentage of women in parliament, the UK ranked 17th with 29.6% in those positions and 22.5% of women were in ministerial positions, ranking the UK 27th out of the 41 countries in the study.

It is clear a lot of work needs to be done for the UK to break in the top 10. The BBC reported last week that just 1 in 3 UK firms have a majority of women among their top earners, which is reflected in this study.

To close the gender gap, employers may have to assess the strategies they have in place to support women in the workplace. This may mean establishing more opportunities for flexible working, better returnship programmes and job protection policies.

“It’s incredibly important to include this aspect of gender disparity when discussing the pay gap because as long as men account for the majority of top earners, women will never be able to close the gap. This could be due in part to maternity-related disadvantages for women, who are often overlooked for promotions or return to underskilled jobs post childbirth. Moving forwards, governments could look to the example of countries such as Sweden whose progressive maternity and paternity laws, as well as subsidized child care, has increased their gender balance in the workplace.” Tracey adds.

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